Military Firearms made after 1898!!



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NOTE!!!- WE HAVE JUST CAME INTO POSSESSION OF AN EXCELLENT 1942 DATED GERMAN LUGER ALONG WITH THE TYPEWRITTEN AND SIGNED LETTER FROM THE VET THAT CAPTURED IT IN NORTH AFRICA AND HERE IT IS!!!

Jmf Consignment 365

Here we have a very special item! This is a WW2 German Lugar captured by an Airman in North Africa!! This Airman is Staff Sgt. Howard Hoehn who captured this luger in 1943 in Tunisia. We have the original letter signed by Howard recalling the capture of the piece. He took it off a dead Motorcycle Soldier at a recent battle! A collector friend of mine purchased this Luger directly from Howard in 2002. Howard recently died in 2019 at the age of 98 so it's time for my friend to move this on as he is in his 70's as well. We have Howards' obit with this grouping as well. The Luger had one magazine and Howard purchased another but we have been unable to find that other magazine but if we do we will include it. Howard was stationed in Trinidad but was sent on detached service to a temporary Air Field in Tunisia, North Africa to assist in changing engines on B-24 planes which had been grounded. Howard and two other GI's went on a little sightseeing trip and ran across this battlefield in which he spotted a wrecked German motorcycle with it's rider deceased. They found his Luger still in the holster and fished it out then putting it in his pocket as they were not supposed to take souveniers at that time. Howard snuck it back into the country and it was never discovered. I have all of that info in his letter along with the serial number of the Luger. Now on to the Luger:

This is an example of a pre-WWII German Nazi Luger pistol that was manufactured by Mauser in 1935. 1935 was the second year of renewed Luger production, as the Nazis already had designs on Lebensraum in Eastern Europe and payback against the French. Fixed sights, with the "G" date mark on the chamber and "S/42" on the front toggle link. Straw colored small parts, checkered grips and a blued magazine with aluminum base. Minus the magazine, the numbers are matching. This 1935 pattern has by the following features: * Flat, checkered toggle knobs. * No grip safety (except for special models like the Mauser Banner grip safety and the Krieghoff grip safety models). * Stock lug. * Salt blue finish. * Aluminum-base magazine. * Six-groove rifling, 1 turn in 25 cm.The "G" Code denotes the last date of production as 1935. This was the last year that the germans concealed their production date on weaons of war. This pistol is all matching numbers not including the magazine. The Luger is in very fine conditionand would rate up there in condition overall. The straw parts are very strong with somewhat light wear on the inside of the trigger. The original blue rust is very nice and the grips pretty nice as well with a depression in the obverse grip at the top. The bore and chamber show almost no wear at all. Very nice! The aluminum toggle plug on the magazine shows the serial number of 2634 as well as what looks like an eagle over 63. Take a look at the pics! They pretty much say it all! Fantastic!!! Finding original WW2 weapons with signed documentation as to where and when this vet acquired it is getting quite rare today. C&R Eligible ! Take a look at the pics! They pretty much say it all! Fantastic!!! For this firearm and the history $7,500.00

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Japanese Arisaka Type 99 7.7 mm rifles:

The Type 99 rifle Arisaka was a bolt-action rifle of the Arisaka design used by the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II.

During the Second Sino-Japanese War in the 1930s, the Japanese soon found that the 7.7mm cartridge being fired by their Type 92 heavy machine gun in China was superior to the 6.5×50mm cartridge of the Type 38 rifle. This necessitated the development of a new weapon to replace the outclassed Type 38, and finally standardize on a single rifle cartridge. The Imperial Japanese Army (IJA) developed the Type 99 based on the Type 38 rifle but with a caliber of 7.7mm. The Type 99 was produced at nine different arsenals. Seven arsenals were located in Japan, with the other two located at Mukden in Manchukuo and Jinsen in Korea.

The IJA had intended to completely replace the Type 38 with the Type 99 by the end of the war. However, the outbreak of the Pacific war never allowed the army to completely replace the Type 38 and so the IJA used both rifles extensively during the war. As the war progressed, more and more cost saving steps were introduced in order to speed up production. Late war rifles are often called "last ditch" or "substitute standard" due to their crudeness of finish. They are generally as crude as the 1945 dated Mauser K98k of Germany, or worse.

The Type 99 was produced in four versions, the regular issue Type 99 short rifle, the Type 99 long rifle (a limited production variant), the take-down Type 2 paratroop rifle, and the Type 99 sniper rifle. The standard rifle also came with a wire monopod and an anti-aircraft sighting device. The Type 99 was the first mass-produced infantry rifle to have a chrome lined bore to ease cleaning. All of these features were abandoned by mid-war.

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Jmf

A. This rifle is a very nice Type 99 Arisaka Rifle in 7.7mm. The action works great and it has a great bore! The receiver is marked 9 9 type and the mum has been only lightly cancelled. The two piece stock is in very nice condition as well. The stock has a ding or two but no cracks or breaks. The long range sight is missing the aircraft lead arms but otherwise complete. I find many later rifles missing these arms so I think at one point they left them off. There is also no dust cover or monopod which is quite common as well. The sling swivels are present and in good condition. Cleaning rod is missing. This rifle was manufactured at the Nagoya Arsenal which made rifles from 1923 to 1945. Serial number 5605. I believe this is a series 5 rifle. No import marks. Check out the pics! $495.00

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Jmf

B. During World War II the Type 99 rifle was the standard long arm of the Japanese Imperial Army. However as the tides of war turned against Japan, Japanese industry found that it had to produce more and more rifles using less and less resources. This involved several modifications to the Type 99 which simplified it. By the last year of the war Japan was manufacturing “last ditch rifles”, which were Type 99’s simplified so much that they were basically reduced to nothing more than a working rifle. While they fired, the effectiveness and quality of such rifles was questionable.

This rifle is a nice 34th series "Last Ditch" type 99 rifle with the mum intact. This one still has a few refinements that are not on the last "Last Ditch" riflessuch as a bayonet lug and sling swivels. This one also has the dust cover intact. The quality is a little lacking, but believe me, it gets much worse!! This rifle is in good condition but more crudely made than the earlier ones. You can see welds on the front barrel band and it has a wooden butt plate plus no cleaning rod. The cocking knob is not knurled being blob welded on as well. Still a two piece dovetailed stock with a handguard and still rather nice. The rifle has a crude later rear block sight and a front wedge blade sight. No long range sight on this series. This rifle was manfactured at Toyo Kogyo in Hiroshima. This rifle has Japanese characters on the stock but I do not know what they mean so if you do let me know and I will post it. The action works well on this 7.7mm rifle and the bore/rifling is good. All in all a good example of a last attempt to continue war. $695.00

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Jmf

C. This Arisaka Type 99 7.7mm rifle is an import from C.A.I. (Central Arms International) out of Vermont. This is one that was imported from China sometime after the war. It's rare to find a Japanese Arisaka with import markings on it as most were destroyed after the war except for G.I.Bringbacks but the U.S. Government furnished Japanese Arisaka's to the Chinese after the war. This one has seen hard use but is still mostly intact and has the Mum intact as well! This rifle is from the Nagoya Arsenal (1923-1945). The rifle is in generally good condition with good markings. The stock is in good "dinged" condition having been used considerably and the bore is quite serviceable. This rifle has the cleaning rod. It is missing the front barrel sling but has the rear sling. The rear sight is the long range sight without the aircraft leading "wings", never had them. The front sight is the typical protected sight. THe action works well. Nice old Arisaka and lucky to be here since it went to China after the War !!! Check out the pics!!! $495.00

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Italian Carcano Rifle in 6.5 shortened to sporter

Carcano is the frequently used name for a series of Italian bolt-action, magazine-fed, repeating military rifles and carbines. Introduced in 1891, this rifle was chambered for the rimless 6.5×52mm Carcano round (Cartuccia Modello 1895). It was developed by the chief technician Salvatore Carcano at the Turin Army Arsenal in 1890, and was originally called the Modello (model) 91 or simply M91. Successively replacing the previous Vetterli-Vitali rifles and carbines in 10.35×47mmR, it was produced from 1892 to 1945. The M91 was used in both rifle (fucile) and shorter-barreled carbine (moschetto) form by most Italian troops during World War I and by Italian and some German forces during World War II. The rifle was also used during the Winter War by Finland, and again by regular and irregular forces in Syria, Libya, Tunisia and Algeria during various postwar conflicts in those countries.

This particular Carcano Rifle/Carbine has has the stock shortened and the original front barrel band removed. Also the top hand guard is missing. I think that this one originally had provisions for a bayonet to be attached. The barrel is 17 inches long to the receiver making me believe that it is the original barrel. The receiver has good markings on it including the date of 1917. The stock that's left is in good condition and looks nice. The action works very well and the bore is very nice! The original rear adjustable sight is still present and operating well. Should be a great shooter!!! For this piece $325.00

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Jmf

CZ vz Model 27 pistol. The vz. 27 is a Czechoslovak semi-automatic pistol, based on the pistole vz. 24, and chambered for 7.65 mm Browning/.32 ACP. It is often designated the CZ 27 after the naming scheme used by the Ceská zbrojovka factory for post-World War II commercial products. However, it is correctly known as vz. 27, an abbreviation of the Czech "vzor 27", or "Model 27". By 1924 Model 24, began production at the Ceska Zbrojovka (CZ) plant in Strakonice. Built in 9mm short (.380 acp) the sidearm was accurate and well-balanced and, not surprisingly, reflected elements of an earlier Nickl design that had been rejected by the German army during the First World War. The military declared the Cz-24 a success and quickly placed an order for 100,000 units to be delivered over the course of 5 years (1924-1928). Delays plagued the contract and it would not be until 1931 that the order was finally filled by CZ. Part of the problem concerned the new plant’s ability to operate at such high production levels, while another problem concerned the pistol design itself. The original design had been for a 9mm Parabellum round and, as such, the Cz-24 employed a semi-locking bolt and a short recoil action where the barrel rotated as part of the rearward movement. The problem was that changing the caliber of the design to 9mm Short meant that this feature was an unnecessary and now nothing more than a manufacturing complication. Realizing that the pistol could be redesigned in a simple blowback action, CZ engineer and designer, Frantisek Myska, began work on a 7.65mm (.32 acp) version. The result was the Model 27 or vzor. 27 or, as it is more commonly known in the West, the Cz-27. The eight-shot pistol retained the earlier look of the Cz-24 but cost about half the price to produce. The new sidearm was issued to police, security units, and border guards, as well as being sold on the commercial market. Beyond questions concerning the stopping abilities of its round, the Cz-27 was well liked. The sidearm proved durable, and had an unmistakable snappy retort upon firing. From its adoption in 1927 to the German occupation of Czechoslovakia in 1939, approximately 183,000 units were produced.

When Germany secured the country in 1939 the entire Czech arms industry was put into motion. The German army for instance, satisfied with the Czech LT-38 tanks, incorporated them into Panzer regiments under the designation Panzerkampfwagon 38t. Pistols were no exception to this rule. The Heereswaffenamt (German Army Weapons Office) examined the Czech Cz-27 and, liking what they saw, ordered Ceska Zbrojovka to continue producing the sidearm. The CZ plant at Strakonice was renamed Bohmische Waffenfabrik AG and production was restarted on the pistol which was given the German designation Pistole Modell 27. In the 13 years before German control the average monthly output of Cz-27s was just over 1000 per month, but with the logistical pressures of the Second World War the Strakonice plant’s output jumped to over seven times that number. In all, 475,000 units were produced under German direction before the American army took control of the Strakonice factory in May, 1945. These sidearms were primarily issued to security forces and police units, with reports that the Luftwaffe and Army also employed the pistol as an acceptable substitute.

Upon the conclusion of the conflict the company quickly returned to its old name and to production of the Cz-27 as well. The Czech government ordered 45,000, which were produced in 1945 to 1946. In the late 1940s the pistol was exported to a number of countries and military contracts were signed with India, Poland, and several South American nations. Model 27 production was officially phased out in 1950 with the introduction of the 7.65mm Cz-50. In all, almost three quarter of a million Cz-27s were made over a 24-year span, making it one of the most mass produced 7.65mm designs in history.

German production can be broken down into several broad categories. All will have “Pistole Modell 27 Kal. 7,65” stamped on the left hand side of the slide. Early German production at the Strakonice plant was stamped “Bohmische WaffenfabrikAG in Prag.” and the serial number along the spine of the slide.

This one has those particular markings on it. This firearm was produced during Nazi occupation and is in very good conditon. Markings are sharp, action works flawlessly and the bore is excellent. S/N matches. The magazine is marked P.Mod 27. Not perfect of course but very nice! Check out the pics! $650.00

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Jmf

7.65 "ALLIES" MARKED SEMI AUTO PISTOL made by Fab. de Bersaluzze Arieto-Aurena Y Cia, Eibar – “Allies”.

Spanish Eibar/Ruby Pistols. One of the more successful early automatic pistol designs of the turn of the century was John Browning’s Colt and FN 1903 (which were different guns, but used the same basic design). Spanish shops quickly began making their own copies of this very popular pistol, and one of them hit the proverbial jackpot. In 1914, the company of Gabilondo y Urresti (later to become known as Llama) built a better-than-average 1903 copy called the Ruby, chambered for .32ACP and with a 9-round magazine (larger than most of these types of pistols). Gabilondo sent a sample to France, whose government was in need of a huge number of pistols for the recently-begun First World War. The French found the pistol to be well-suited to their needs (cheap and effective), and proceeded to place a standing order in May 1915 for 10,000 of them per month. Pistols made for the French Army typically had a one- or two-letter mark in an oval on the rear left of the frame. These letters identified the manufacturer, irrespective of trademark name (see below for a list of these markings). In addition, pistols were supposed to be marked with a star or pair of stars on the bottom of the frame alongside the magazine well when they were formally accepted for French service. Not all of them received this depending on how urgent the need for guns was when a shipment arrived, but it is a useful marking to look for. This particular pistol has the BA stampings in an oval on the magazine and on the pistol at the rear of the frame on the left side indicating French Military Use.

From the early 1950s, to as late as 1960, the government arms factory at Kongsberg assessed the 7.65 mm pistols and marked them for Police use. It is reported that only top condition pistols were retained and others scrapped. The most commonly remarked pistols were the Browning M1922, CZ27, Mauser 1914/1934, and Mauser HSc. This particular pistol is marked to the Politi (Police) on the top of the slide.

The Eibar/Ruby pistols’ most distinctive identifying features are:

Shrouded hammer

Lumpy-looking safety lever above trigger

Longitudinal grooves around the muzzle for disassembly

Long 9-round magazine with heel release

all of which this pistol has.

This pistol is in very good condition although the slide stamping is a bit light regarding the maker. The action works just fine and the bore is nice. The wood grips are in very nice conditon as well. There are two different numbers stamped on the frame. This is a good one! CHeck out the pics! $450.00

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Jmf

type B baby nambu 7mm pistol

The Nambu Automatic Pistol Type B, or “Baby Nambu” as it is known in US collecting circles, is a scaled-down companion to the 1902 “Grandpa” Nambu pistol. It was intended as a private purchase option for officers who needed to carry a sidearm, but did not want or need a full size service pistol. It was chambered for the 7mm Nambu cartridge (roughly on par with .25ACP).

Despite its small size and light cartridge, the Baby Nambu copied the complete locking system of the larger Nambu, resulting in a quite expensive pistol. As a result, demand was somewhat lacking, and only 6500 were manufactured between 1903 and 1929, when production ended. Most of these were made by the Tokyo Army Arsenal, although production did move to the TG&E company in about 1923 (presumably after the great Tokyo earthquake).

Just over 6,500 Baby Nambu pistols were manufactured from 1907 to 1923. Six thousand units came from the Tokyo Arsenal ( as this one did) , while five hundred units were produced by Tokyo Gas & Electric. Assembly took place until 1929. In 1923, the production of the Baby Nambu was halted because of the devastation caused by the Great Kanto Earthquake.

The Type B Model was initially intended for use by paratroopers and tank crews. It was never officially adopted by the Japanese Army, but it was made available to service members at discounted rates. Unfortunately, the cost of the Nambu equaled to about twice a new Lieutenant's pay in 1923, making it too expensive for a military contract.

This particular pistol is in good condition having some moderately severe pitting in a few places as you can see in the photographs indicating that it was stored poorly. The grips are prefect as well as the action and the bore is excellent! Except for the pitting this pistol has an excellent finish! Hard to believe that any pitting is here. This is a rare, hard to find pistol in any conditon! All s/n match except the magazine. Usually brings about $5500.00 but in this conditon this one is $3200.00 Check out the pics!!!

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Japanese Arisaka Type 99 7.7 mm rifles:

The Type 99 rifle Arisaka was a bolt-action rifle of the Arisaka design used by the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II.

During the Second Sino-Japanese War in the 1930s, the Japanese soon found that the 7.7mm cartridge being fired by their Type 92 heavy machine gun in China was superior to the 6.5×50mm cartridge of the Type 38 rifle. This necessitated the development of a new weapon to replace the outclassed Type 38, and finally standardize on a single rifle cartridge. The Imperial Japanese Army (IJA) developed the Type 99 based on the Type 38 rifle but with a caliber of 7.7mm. The Type 99 was produced at nine different arsenals. Seven arsenals were located in Japan, with the other two located at Mukden in Manchukuo and Jinsen in Korea.

The IJA had intended to completely replace the Type 38 with the Type 99 by the end of the war. However, the outbreak of the Pacific war never allowed the army to completely replace the Type 38 and so the IJA used both rifles extensively during the war. As the war progressed, more and more cost saving steps were introduced in order to speed up production. Late war rifles are often called "last ditch" or "substitute standard" due to their crudeness of finish. They are generally as crude as the 1945 dated Mauser K98k of Germany, or worse.

The Type 99 was produced in four versions, the regular issue Type 99 short rifle, the Type 99 long rifle (a limited production variant), the take-down Type 2 paratroop rifle, and the Type 99 sniper rifle. The standard rifle also came with a wire monopod and an anti-aircraft sighting device. The Type 99 was the first mass-produced infantry rifle to have a chrome lined bore to ease cleaning. All of these features were abandoned by mid-war.

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Jmf Consignment 364

A. This rifle is a very nice Type 99 Arisaka Rifle in 7.7mm. The action works great and it has a great bore! The receiver is marked 9 9 type and the mum has been only lightly cancelled. The two piece stock is in very nice condition as well. The stock has a ding or two but no cracks or breaks. The long range sight is missing the aircraft lead arms but otherwise complete. I find many later rifles missing these arms so I think at one point they left them off. There is also no dust cover or monopod which is quite common as well. The sling swivels are present and in good condition. Cleaning rod is missing. This rifle was manufactured at the Nagoya Arsenal which made rifles from 1923 to 1945. Serial number 5605. I believe this is a series 5 rifle. No import marks. Check out the pics! $495.00

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Jmf Consignment 363

B. During World War II the Type 99 rifle was the standard long arm of the Japanese Imperial Army. However as the tides of war turned against Japan, Japanese industry found that it had to produce more and more rifles using less and less resources. This involved several modifications to the Type 99 which simplified it. By the last year of the war Japan was manufacturing “last ditch rifles”, which were Type 99’s simplified so much that they were basically reduced to nothing more than a working rifle. While they fired, the effectiveness and quality of such rifles was questionable.

This rifle is a nice 34th series "Last Ditch" type 99 rifle with the mum intact. This one still has a few refinements that are not on the last "Last Ditch" riflessuch as a bayonet lug and sling swivels. This one also has the dust cover intact. The quality is a little lacking, but believe me, it gets much worse!! This rifle is in good condition but more crudely made than the earlier ones. You can see welds on the front barrel band and it has a wooden butt plate plus no cleaning rod. The cocking knob is not knurled being blob welded on as well. Still a two piece dovetailed stock with a handguard and still rather nice. The rifle has a crude later rear block sight and a front wedge blade sight. No long range sight on this series. This rifle was manfactured at Toyo Kogyo in Hiroshima. This rifle has Japanese characters on the stock but I do not know what they mean so if you do let me know and I will post it. The action works well on this 7.7mm rifle and the bore/rifling is good. All in all a good example of a last attempt to continue war. $695.00

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Jmf Consignment 362

C. This Arisaka Type 99 7.7mm rifle is an import from C.A.I. (Central Arms International) out of Vermont. This is one that was imported from China sometime after the war. It's rare to find a Japanese Arisaka with import markings on it as most were destroyed after the war except for G.I.Bringbacks but the U.S. Government furnished Japanese Arisaka's to the Chinese after the war. This one has seen hard use but is still mostly intact and has the Mum intact as well! This rifle is from the Nagoya Arsenal (1923-1945). The rifle is in generally good condition with good markings. The stock is in good "dinged" condition having been used considerably and the bore is quite serviceable. This rifle has the cleaning rod. It is missing the front barrel sling but has the rear sling. The rear sight is the long range sight without the aircraft leading "wings", never had them. The front sight is the typical protected sight. THe action works well. Nice old Arisaka and lucky to be here since it went to China after the War !!! Check out the pics!!! $495.00

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Jmf Consignment 361

Italian Carcano Rifle in 6.5 shortened to sporter

Carcano is the frequently used name for a series of Italian bolt-action, magazine-fed, repeating military rifles and carbines. Introduced in 1891, this rifle was chambered for the rimless 6.5×52mm Carcano round (Cartuccia Modello 1895). It was developed by the chief technician Salvatore Carcano at the Turin Army Arsenal in 1890, and was originally called the Modello (model) 91 or simply M91. Successively replacing the previous Vetterli-Vitali rifles and carbines in 10.35×47mmR, it was produced from 1892 to 1945. The M91 was used in both rifle (fucile) and shorter-barreled carbine (moschetto) form by most Italian troops during World War I and by Italian and some German forces during World War II. The rifle was also used during the Winter War by Finland, and again by regular and irregular forces in Syria, Libya, Tunisia and Algeria during various postwar conflicts in those countries.

This particular Carcano Rifle/Carbine has has the stock shortened and the original front barrel band removed. Also the top hand guard is missing. I think that this one originally had provisions for a bayonet to be attached. The barrel is 17 inches long to the receiver making me believe that it is the original barrel. The receiver has good markings on it including the date of 1917. The stock that's left is in good condition and looks nice. The action works very well and the bore is very nice! The original rear adjustable sight is still present and operating well. Should be a great shooter!!! For this piece $325.00

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jmf 359 Consignment

CZ vz Model 27 pistol. The vz. 27 is a Czechoslovak semi-automatic pistol, based on the pistole vz. 24, and chambered for 7.65 mm Browning/.32 ACP. It is often designated the CZ 27 after the naming scheme used by the Ceská zbrojovka factory for post-World War II commercial products. However, it is correctly known as vz. 27, an abbreviation of the Czech "vzor 27", or "Model 27". By 1924 Model 24, began production at the Ceska Zbrojovka (CZ) plant in Strakonice. Built in 9mm short (.380 acp) the sidearm was accurate and well-balanced and, not surprisingly, reflected elements of an earlier Nickl design that had been rejected by the German army during the First World War. The military declared the Cz-24 a success and quickly placed an order for 100,000 units to be delivered over the course of 5 years (1924-1928). Delays plagued the contract and it would not be until 1931 that the order was finally filled by CZ. Part of the problem concerned the new plant’s ability to operate at such high production levels, while another problem concerned the pistol design itself. The original design had been for a 9mm Parabellum round and, as such, the Cz-24 employed a semi-locking bolt and a short recoil action where the barrel rotated as part of the rearward movement. The problem was that changing the caliber of the design to 9mm Short meant that this feature was an unnecessary and now nothing more than a manufacturing complication. Realizing that the pistol could be redesigned in a simple blowback action, CZ engineer and designer, Frantisek Myska, began work on a 7.65mm (.32 acp) version. The result was the Model 27 or vzor. 27 or, as it is more commonly known in the West, the Cz-27. The eight-shot pistol retained the earlier look of the Cz-24 but cost about half the price to produce. The new sidearm was issued to police, security units, and border guards, as well as being sold on the commercial market. Beyond questions concerning the stopping abilities of its round, the Cz-27 was well liked. The sidearm proved durable, and had an unmistakable snappy retort upon firing. From its adoption in 1927 to the German occupation of Czechoslovakia in 1939, approximately 183,000 units were produced.

When Germany secured the country in 1939 the entire Czech arms industry was put into motion. The German army for instance, satisfied with the Czech LT-38 tanks, incorporated them into Panzer regiments under the designation Panzerkampfwagon 38t. Pistols were no exception to this rule. The Heereswaffenamt (German Army Weapons Office) examined the Czech Cz-27 and, liking what they saw, ordered Ceska Zbrojovka to continue producing the sidearm. The CZ plant at Strakonice was renamed Bohmische Waffenfabrik AG and production was restarted on the pistol which was given the German designation Pistole Modell 27. In the 13 years before German control the average monthly output of Cz-27s was just over 1000 per month, but with the logistical pressures of the Second World War the Strakonice plant’s output jumped to over seven times that number. In all, 475,000 units were produced under German direction before the American army took control of the Strakonice factory in May, 1945. These sidearms were primarily issued to security forces and police units, with reports that the Luftwaffe and Army also employed the pistol as an acceptable substitute.

Upon the conclusion of the conflict the company quickly returned to its old name and to production of the Cz-27 as well. The Czech government ordered 45,000, which were produced in 1945 to 1946. In the late 1940s the pistol was exported to a number of countries and military contracts were signed with India, Poland, and several South American nations. Model 27 production was officially phased out in 1950 with the introduction of the 7.65mm Cz-50. In all, almost three quarter of a million Cz-27s were made over a 24-year span, making it one of the most mass produced 7.65mm designs in history.

German production can be broken down into several broad categories. All will have “Pistole Modell 27 Kal. 7,65” stamped on the left hand side of the slide. Early German production at the Strakonice plant was stamped “Bohmische WaffenfabrikAG in Prag.” and the serial number along the spine of the slide.

This one has those particular markings on it. This firearm was produced during Nazi occupation and is in very good conditon. Markings are sharp, action works flawlessly and the bore is excellent. S/N matches. The magazine is marked P.Mod 27. Not perfect of course but very nice! Check out the pics! $650.00

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jmf 358 Consignment

7.65 "ALLIES" MARKED SEMI AUTO PISTOL made by Fab. de Bersaluzze Arieto-Aurena Y Cia, Eibar – “Allies”.

Spanish Eibar/Ruby Pistols. One of the more successful early automatic pistol designs of the turn of the century was John Browning’s Colt and FN 1903 (which were different guns, but used the same basic design). Spanish shops quickly began making their own copies of this very popular pistol, and one of them hit the proverbial jackpot. In 1914, the company of Gabilondo y Urresti (later to become known as Llama) built a better-than-average 1903 copy called the Ruby, chambered for .32ACP and with a 9-round magazine (larger than most of these types of pistols). Gabilondo sent a sample to France, whose government was in need of a huge number of pistols for the recently-begun First World War. The French found the pistol to be well-suited to their needs (cheap and effective), and proceeded to place a standing order in May 1915 for 10,000 of them per month. Pistols made for the French Army typically had a one- or two-letter mark in an oval on the rear left of the frame. These letters identified the manufacturer, irrespective of trademark name (see below for a list of these markings). In addition, pistols were supposed to be marked with a star or pair of stars on the bottom of the frame alongside the magazine well when they were formally accepted for French service. Not all of them received this depending on how urgent the need for guns was when a shipment arrived, but it is a useful marking to look for. This particular pistol has the BA stampings in an oval on the magazine and on the pistol at the rear of the frame on the left side indicating French Military Use.

From the early 1950s, to as late as 1960, the government arms factory at Kongsberg assessed the 7.65 mm pistols and marked them for Police use. It is reported that only top condition pistols were retained and others scrapped. The most commonly remarked pistols were the Browning M1922, CZ27, Mauser 1914/1934, and Mauser HSc. This particular pistol is marked to the Politi (Police) on the top of the slide.

The Eibar/Ruby pistols’ most distinctive identifying features are:

Shrouded hammer

Lumpy-looking safety lever above trigger

Longitudinal grooves around the muzzle for disassembly

Long 9-round magazine with heel release

all of which this pistol has.

This pistol is in very good condition although the slide stamping is a bit light regarding the maker. The action works just fine and the bore is nice. The wood grips are in very nice conditon as well. There are two different numbers stamped on the frame. This is a good one! CHeck out the pics! $450.00

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jmf 357 Consignment

type B baby nambu 7mm pistol

The Nambu Automatic Pistol Type B, or “Baby Nambu” as it is known in US collecting circles, is a scaled-down companion to the 1902 “Grandpa” Nambu pistol. It was intended as a private purchase option for officers who needed to carry a sidearm, but did not want or need a full size service pistol. It was chambered for the 7mm Nambu cartridge (roughly on par with .25ACP).

Despite its small size and light cartridge, the Baby Nambu copied the complete locking system of the larger Nambu, resulting in a quite expensive pistol. As a result, demand was somewhat lacking, and only 6500 were manufactured between 1903 and 1929, when production ended. Most of these were made by the Tokyo Army Arsenal, although production did move to the TG&E company in about 1923 (presumably after the great Tokyo earthquake).

Just over 6,500 Baby Nambu pistols were manufactured from 1907 to 1923. Six thousand units came from the Tokyo Arsenal ( as this one did) , while five hundred units were produced by Tokyo Gas & Electric. Assembly took place until 1929. In 1923, the production of the Baby Nambu was halted because of the devastation caused by the Great Kanto Earthquake.

The Type B Model was initially intended for use by paratroopers and tank crews. It was never officially adopted by the Japanese Army, but it was made available to service members at discounted rates. Unfortunately, the cost of the Nambu equaled to about twice a new Lieutenant's pay in 1923, making it too expensive for a military contract.

This particular pistol is in good condition having some moderately severe pitting in a few places as you can see in the photographs indicating that it was stored poorly. The grips are prefect as well as the action and the bore is excellent! Except for the pitting this pistol has an excellent finish! Hard to believe that any pitting is here. This is a rare, hard to find pistol in any conditon! All s/n match except the magazine. Usually brings about $5500.00 but in this conditon this one is $3200.00 Check out the pics!!!

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jmf 356 Consignment

Here we have a Japanese WW2 era type 38 training rifle probably for a school. Starting in the 1920's, the Japanese government required all junior and senior high school boys to have two hours a week of military training. Several companies started producing the necessary training rifles for this purpose. These training rifles had no standard design and were often made from older models of military rifles or parts from these rifles. Therefore you will find many variations of the same model. There are known models that used 1888 Mauser, type 99, type 30, and type 38 rifle parts. These training rifles continued to be produced until the late 1930's. Some of these rifles could not be fired while others would fire wooden bullet blank ammunition. Many of the blank firing rifles were made with smooth bore barrels. Rarely would any of these rifles fire the standard service round. Nearly all of these training rifles could carry bayonets. This one is in excellent overall condition and except for the smooth bore one would think that this is an operable firearm. Why the Japanese didn't make functional weapons that could fire both types of ammo is beyond me. This particular rifle is of an excellent quality with loading magazine, good sights, and a cleaning rod. There are no markings on the receiver like the military rifles. The serial number is 174 and matches on the bolt as well. The stock is in very good condition and only has one small chip out of it that I have shown in a pic below. The Japanese characters are stamped on the obverse and reverse buttstock. This rifle functions flawlessly and looks great. For this piece of history $295.00

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355.JAH

Consignment Modern guns 81

Here we have an old Czechoslovakian VZ-24 Mauser in 7.92 mm caliber with a 23 inch barrel to the receiver. This thing has been shortened with a pistol grip but has the original length 24 inch barrel with the original sights. The action works just fine but I have not shot it. It's kind of rough but still neat! You just wonder what the motivation was for this! The bore is dark but you can still see groove pretty well. Take a look at the pics! $250.00

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354

Here we have a good used magazine for the Springfield M1A/M14 .308 Winchester 20 Rounds Steel Blued. This one is just like the ProMag magazine that sells for over $30 but here you can save as this one is $20. No markings.

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Consignment JMF 353

Here is a nice Type 38 Rifle. This rifle does not have the cleaning rod but does have an intact MUM !! The action works well and the wood is in slightly more used condition and the bore is dark with deep lands and grooves. The stock has some slight separation at the dovetail and a few more bruises that the one above. More of the original bluing to the barrel and receiver is present on this one not having tured to a nice dark patina. The rear ladder sight is present and complete as well. This is a nice rifle is slightly less condition that it’s mate above. This one was done at the same arsenal as the one above. Take a look at the pics! $425.00

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CONSIGNMENT 352

REPLACEMENT SKS STOCK

This is actually an original SKS stock for the SKS rifle that is so popular today. This stock was taken off the original rifle and replaced with a poly stock. If you have a SKS that is in need of a new stock then here's one for you. $45.00 Modern Guns 4

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Jmf 351

Here we have a good WW2 Japanese Nambu 8mm pistol with the Nagoya Arsenal mark. This particular pistol was made in 1943. When the company’s “original series” production reached serial number 99999, it began its “First Series” production and added the First Series symbol, the first letter of the Japanese katakana “alphabet”. This is the same symbol used for the First Series Toriimatsu guns described in an earlier section. The mark looks like an upside down letter y in a circle. These were the only Type 14s with three symbols in front of the serial number: the Nagoya Arsenal logo, the Nambu company logo and the First Series marker. Yes, it seems odd to us to call it the “First Series” when they had a run of serial numbers before that, but think of first as meaning “the first series that needed a series designation because we had used all the permissible serial numbers without one”. The symbols were poorly struck on a very crudely machined, uneven surface (attention to finishing was already breaking down by the time this gun was made). This nambu also has the larger trigger guard. The action seems to work well and there is nice rifling down the barrel. There is some rust on this piece and some pitting noted on back and fore strap of the grip which you can see in the pics. This is definitely a vet bring back but the history has been lost I am afraid. Take a look at the pics! For this old symbol of the Rising Sun $895.00

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Jmf 350

SOLD

Here we have a parts revolver. It's been nickeled and I believe it was originally blue. This is a Colt Commando in .38 caliber. It's a govt. issue and I can still see the govt. inspectors initials above the cylinder to the rear of the frame. The Colt commando was developed as a Handgun For Guards and Aircrew. The production of the Official Police revolver would be interrupted with the advent of the Colt Commando at the outbreak of World War II. The necessity arose for the Colt Commando as the CMC was deluged with government orders for the M1911A1 pistol and other guns, and a desperate need developed to cut production time and costs in the manufacture line of the Official Police revolver. Little is known about the role of the Colt Commando during World War II as a variant of the Official Police revolver. According to gun historian Charles Pate, “Many more [Commandos] were used by the military than is commonly known.” Well, this one has been there and done that! Nothing left now except the frame, frame yoke, cylinder and barrel. A complete one of these revolvers sold recently for $1.275.00 Since this one is just parts $75.00

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tc 349

New Arrival to the shop 308

Here we have a vintage WW2 Australian used flare Gun! This Signal Device is Very Nice, Numbers Matching, Australian 43 (1943) MK. III CSR (Central Sugar Refinery) Sydney Flare Gun / Signal Pistol of the Webley Pattern. Here are some of the details:

Dated 43 (1943) and bears crisp, legible, military acceptance marks on all parts of the gun. Flared Barrel Length is 6" and bore is in excellent, moderately clean condition (I haven't cleaned it so what you see is what you get). Walnut Grips are in good Condition with Minor Scratches with one chip out of the reverse grip. The grips seem to be slightly different but by the impressions on the underside of the grips they have been on this particular flare gun a long, long time. All parts of the gun are tight and work fine and includes the lanyard ring. . Brass has not been cleaned and has a very nice old patina. It looks great! For this piece of History $350.00 Take a look at the pics!!!

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Consignment New Arrival to the shop 348

Here we have a pretty good commando stock for the M1 Carbine. These stocks were made back in the 1980’s for the Ier Johnson Commando Model M1 Carbine. There is a small chip that I can see at the back where the barrel fits in and a couple of minor scraps and scuffs other wise fine. Take a look at the pics! $150.00

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Jmf

Consignment 347

Here we have a beautiful Late Postwar Bolo Model Model 1896 “Broomhandle Mauser Pistol”. These type of pistols were manufactured from 1896 to 1939. This model has the walnut grips with 22 grooves and looks like the early model 1930 model except that model has 12 grooves in the grips. This one has the usual Mauser markings that you can see in the pics and two Chinese characters which is not uncommon. This firearm comes with an original wooden holster/stock and the pistol fits nicely inside. The slot on the pistol is a little shorter than the piece that fits in it on the holster so this holster may be for another gun. The holster has a turn wheel to tighten it up on the grip and that does work but not the greatest in the world. There are no markings on the wooden holster stock. This is one beautiful outfit !!! For this set $1950.00

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Consignment SOLD!!!

Here’s a dandy Colt 1911 .45 Pistol! I was really excited at first because the slide is marked Colt in the pre ww1 way and the serial number is a 3 digit number which would have had it being made in the first year of production! It should have been marked U.S.Navy but instead it was marked U.S. Army and I noticed that there was a ‘0’ starting the serial number which I thought was odd and then I thought that the font of the serial number numbers were all wrong so I did some more checking and to my utter surprise I found a manufacturers marking above that serial number! It is so small I almost couldn’t see it without a magnifier! The real manufacture of this Colt 1911 is AR SALES CO from So. Elmonte, Ca! There were in business from 1968 to 1977 and not only put 1911’s together from parts but mfg. aluminum frames. This one has the aluminum frame with original Colt parts and it looks just like it ought to look which is kind of scarey! It functions very well and looks great! Bore is great! Look at the pics.. Instead of purchasing the first year of production Colt for $8,000.00 you can have this great look alike with original Colt parts for $925.00 !!

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Jmf 346

Here we have a black dyed leather US 1911 Holster marked US and made by Boyt. Boyt holsters are usually dated but I cannot find a date on this one. This holster was found hanging in the attic so consequently is kind of hard and needs some leather preservative put on it. Even a little neetsfoot oil should soften it up a bit. The shoulder holster rig seems complete and was a favority amongst Tanker crews I was told. You can have this original rig for $150.00

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tc 345

SOLD

Here we have a .22 training rifle. This is a Cugir single shot .22 LR firearm. The Cugir model was a military trainer that was made for the Romanian Army. This particular rifle is in good condition with just an age crack in the Beech stock along with several dings from use. The barrel is heavy being 27 ½ inches long with a heavy block sight at the rear blade sight at the front. The receiver is marked with the Crest and the UMC CUGIR. The S/N is 1956-12469 and I believe it was made in 1956. This rifle is all original and has not been messed with! I see no import marks on it. It’s heavy for a .22 weighing a whopping 8 pounds!!! Check out the pics!!! For this piece of History $325.00

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jmf 344

m1 garand stock

Here we have an unused M1 Garand stock. We believe that this one came from old arsenal restock stock but it is not marked. The hand guard is not included and we do not have it but otherwise this stock is complete and in very nice dusty condition! NO cracks or breaks! For this one $40.00

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Consignment 343

Here we have a great early condition Japanese WW2 Nambu T-14 8mm pistol! This pistol was made in May 1937 under the Nagoya Arsenal supervision by Koku Dunji. The condition is like unissued but I am sure it was captured as there is a photo of an American Girl under one of the grips. I cannot make out what is written on the back side of the photo. The action is superb and the bore is excellent. The only wear is a little scratch where the safety was engaged on the frame which is not unusual. Use the safety one time and that scratch is there. Look at the pics!!! $1100.00

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Consignment 342

Here we have another Japanese T-14 Nambu 8mm pistol in rubberized fabric holster with shoulder sling that was produced in November of 1943, notice the late style trigger guard to accommodate gloved fingers. Look like the name BEHREND is written in english letters on the holster. Probably the soldier that captured it but I have no info on that. This is a Toriimatsu Second Series pistol. It has the Nagoya arsenal symbol, followed by the series marker (a small square inside a circle), followed by the serial number which is 103. The little square in the series marker is the Japanese katakana (phonetic) symbol ro (pronounced as in “row your boat”); it is the second “letter” in the traditional order of the Japanese “alphabet”. Serial numbers in the Second Series run from 1 to around 73000, with a handful of very late guns bearing out-of-sequence numbers in the 75000 and 76000 range so you can see this is a VERY early 2nd series gun. This pistol is in very good condition with aged finish on the weapon but still really nice. I believe this weapon saw lots of use but still in excellent operating condition with a nice bore-the bore isn’t perfect but still pretty nice and shootable by all means. Also this pistol comes with the original late rubberized fabric holster that is in good condition! The little tie down tab on the front has fractured but is still there as well as one of the three little springs that hold it down with tension is broker but the other two are still intact. The paper label is missing in the inside of the lid however some Japanese characters are still present on the inside shell. The laminated fabric belt is still all there but the layers have become delaminated. Still it’s there! For this set $1650.00 Check out the pics!

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Consignment 341

Here we have another Late war Japanese T-14 Nambu pistol in 8mm. This one has a better finish than the one above being about 90% or better. Most of the wear is on the high edges. This particular pistol was made in February of 1944. This is also a Toriimatsu Second Series pistol. It has the Nagoya arsenal symbol, followed by the series marker (a small square inside a circle), followed by the serial number which is 17952. The little square in the series marker is the Japanese katakana (phonetic) symbol ro (pronounced as in “row your boat”); it is the second “letter” in the traditional order of the Japanese “alphabet”. Serial numbers in the Second Series run from 1 to around 73000, with a handful of very late guns bearing out-of-sequence numbers in the 75000 and 76000 range so you can see this is a 2nd year 2nd series gun. The pistol itself is in very nice condition and functions quite well! The bore has a bright mirror finish! About the only wear on this piece is where the safety was used. The holster is also the late style rubberized fabric holster but has no belt. Also the stitching has failed holding the lid on the main body so it needs resewn. That is the only thing wrong with this holster. Take a look at the pics! Quite nice! $1350.00

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Consignment 340

Here we have a Model 14 Early Type (1925) Nambu Holster. The pouch holds 2 boxes of cartridges. There is a small pocket along front of the cartridge puch that contains a spare firing pin. The clean rod and an estra magazine was stored internally. This holster is well made of top-grade cowhide. Has the orignal should sling attached as well. This holster came without a pistol in it so we are offering it separately. $225.00

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Consignment 339

Here we have another outstanding Commercial P08 German Luger dated 1920. The only thing I see wrong with this Luger is that there is a little chip out of one of the grips. The numbers on this DWM Luger Looks to perhaps been a rework because the front serial number on the frame is over stamped with the number 5774 j and that number matches on the rest of the Luger except for the later mfg. magazine. The action works fantastic and the bore is pretty good as well. Receiver Proof marks indicatinb 1920-1926 production are stamped on one side of the receiver and an S in a circle next to GERMANY and the serial number 5774 are stamped on the other side of the receiver. The S in the circle indicates that this is a Simpson Rework. Simson & Co S code - produced 1934-1936 under a Military contract (Reichwehr) being Caliber 9mm Parabellum - 4" barrel with 10,000-12,000 produced, 1 to 5 digit serial with letter as this one is. There is a little finish wear here and there as one would expect but still rates excellent. If the magazine is any indication then this Luger was used by the Nazi's as the magazine is marked 37 and has the Nazi Eagle on it. Check out the pics! For this nice Luger $2100.00

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Consignment 338

This next Luger is an Erfurt Rework Luger in 9mm and is double dated 1918-1930. These Lugers are arsenal reworked WW1 Military pistols and were then issued to the German military of Police units in accordance with the Treaty of Versailles. Many thousands of these Lugers were produce and hence many thousands were still being used by the Nazi’s during WW2. This one is most likely a Vet pickup as it has pitting conducive with laying out for a while in the elements. It still functions but not as crisp as it once was and the bore is much nicer than the outer condition! The finish is dark and the grips have considerable wear on them. This pistol has the Military Proof on the Breechblock of the1908 through 1914 models and has the Arsenal Proof for repair, refurbish, or modification plus other marks. The serial number 2184 is matching throughout. The magazine has 37 on it and the German Eagle of WW2 indicating WW2 usage and this magazine definitely matches the condition of the rest of the pistol. Here’s a real piece of history!! $850.00

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Consignment…337

Here we have a very nice double dated 1916-1920 Dated P-08 German Luger. This one was made by DWM. Deutsche Waffen- und Munitionsfabriken Aktiengesellschaft (German Weapons and Munitions public limited company), known as DWM, was an arms company in Imperial Germany created in 1896 when Ludwig Loewe & Company united its weapons and ammunition production facilities within one company. In 1896 Loewe founded Deutsche Waffen- und Munitionsfabriken with a munitions plant in Karlsruhe (Baden), formerly Deutsche Metallpatronenfabrik Lorenz, and the weapons plant in Berlin.

These Lugers are arsenal reworked WW1 Military pistols and were then issued to the German military of Police units in accordance with the Treaty of Versailles. Many thousands of these Lugers were produce and hence many thousands were still being used by the Nazi’s during WW2. This one shows signs of rework especially on the bottom of the grip frame next to the magazine slot. It’s not pretty there but it still works as it should. The rest of the Luger is in great condition exept for a little chip out of the grip near the safety. This one is s/n 80 and is the same throughout except for the magazine which is numbered 6725 and has the Nazi Eagle on it with the number 63 stamped under it. This piece functions just fine and the bore is fair to good with a little pitting present along it’s length. Very nice in spite of that frame repair. Check out the pics! $1250.00

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Consignment 336

Here we have two P08 Luger magazines. One has an aluminum base with no markings and the other has a wooden base with the numbers 8598 on it. $150 each

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335

Here we have 2 german P-08 Luger 9mm magazines.

THE ONE MARKED 553 HAS BEEN SOLD!!!

One is WW1 vintage with the Imperial Eagle on the Aluminum Toggle end piece and one has the WW2 German Waffenmark on it. Each one $145.00 Check out the pics!

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Consignment 334

We have 1 LEFT (SOLD ONE MARKED 2917 AND 6248) of the P-08 WW1 Luger Magazines for sale. There are 2 nickel plated ones and one blued one. The bottom plugs are wood and are numbered 260, SOLD and SOLD respectively. Good Condition! Each $145.00

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WW1 & WW2

333

Here we have a lot of Broom tail Mauser ammo in clips and in box! 7.63 MAUSER Ammo 7.63 Mauser ammunition goes by a few names, 7.63 x 25mm, 7.63 Mauser, and the .30 Mauser automatic. The round is quite proficient and famous, even if you’ve never heard of it before. 7.623 Mauser ammo was the round used in the famed C96 Mauser also known as the “Broomhandle Mauser”. That’s the famed weapon Han Solo wielded in the movie Star Wars. The Mauser factory has produced some of the greatest and most influential weapons and ammunition in the world. 7.63 Mauser rounds were one of the first massively successful automatic cartridge rounds, paving the way for commercial development of automatic pistols the world over. In Europe the round was widely adopted by everyone from Australia, Finland, Austria Hungary, to Germany. The 7.63 Mauser round was not only popular is pistols, but in sub machines guns as well. The Mauser C96 was also converted into one of the first machine pistols. The cartridge found service in numerous wars all over the world, including World War 1 and the Finnish Civil War. Today, 7.63 Mauser ammunition is still being produced and fired in weapons built over a hundred years ago. While the cartridge isn’t in service with any modern military, the round is still popular with numerous collectors, re-enactors, and enthusiasts. 7.63 Mauser is still quite popular with modern ammunition being manufactured for it.

The Mauser C96 (Construktion 96) is a semi automatic pistol that was originally produced by German arms manufacturer Mauser from 1896 to 1937. Unlicensed copies of the gun were also manufactured in Spain and China in the first half of the 20th century. The distinctive characteristics of the C96 are the integral box magazine in front of the trigger, the long barrel, the wooden shoulder stock which gives it the stability of a short-barreled rifle and doubles as a holster or carrying case, and a unique grip shaped like the handle of a broom. The grip earned the gun the nickname "Broomhandle" in the English-speaking world because of its round wooden handle, and in China the C96 was nicknamed the "box cannon" (Chinese: ___; pinyin: hézipào) because of its rectangular internal magazine and the fact it could be holstered in its wooden box-like detachable stock. With its long barrel and high-velocity cartridge, the Mauser C96 had superior range and better penetration than most other pistols; the 7.63×25mm Mauser cartridge was the highest velocity commercially manufactured pistol cartridge until the advent of the .357 Magnum cartridge in 1935. Mauser manufactured approximately 1 million C96 pistols,]while the number produced in Spain and China was large but unknown due to the loss, non-existence or poor preservation of production records from those countries.

Here we have 95 vintage rounds of ammo and 9 separate stripper clips. $125 for the lot.

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CONSIGNMENT

Item No. 342

Here is a post WW2 West German Holster for the FN Hi-Power pistol. This one is early 1950’s and is in very nice condition with only the pull up strap being broken. Nice inside stamps. For this fine black holster $85.00

CONSIGNMENT

Item No. 341

Here we have a P-08 Luger working model that was made in Japan and stamped as such. This piece looks remarkably like the real thing but the barrel is plugged. Some of the parts are somewhat of a rough casting but everything works as it should. I believe you can take this down like the originals and perhaps it had an educational purpose or was a movie prop. Cocks and fires, safety works, Outstanding copy! $195.00

WW1 Artillery Collar Brass

Item No. 157

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